Portraits From Abroad - harvgreenberg
Abroad Portrait 72
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"Aftermath"
Rwanda

Rwanda’s genocide was sparked by the death of the Rwandan President Juvenal Habyarimana, a Hutu, when his plane was shot down above Kigali airport on April 6, 1994. Within hours a campaign of violence spread from the capital throughout the country, and did not subside until three months later after an estimated total of 800,000 Rwandans had been brutally murdered. In addition to the lives lost, the Special Rapporteur on Rwanda estimated that between 2,000 and 5,000 pregnancies resulted from war rape (with 250,000 to 500,000 Rwandan women and girls suffering rape). Even after the torturous three months, reintegration was difficult for many people because the violence that had occurred often involved neighbors; people still lived next to rapists, murderers, and torturers. Over the years, however, reintegration between the groups has slowly taken place, especially with the local gacaca (community courts) in place to prosecute participants of the genocide. According to the World Report 2012, community-based gacaca courts had almost completed their work, after trying more than 1.2 million cases related to the 1994 genocide.

"Aftermath"

Rwanda

Rwanda’s genocide was sparked by the death of the Rwandan President Juvenal Habyarimana, a Hutu, when his plane was shot down above Kigali airport on April 6, 1994. Within hours a campaign of violence spread from the capital throughout the country, and did not subside until three months later after an estimated total of 800,000 Rwandans had been brutally murdered. In addition to the lives lost, the Special Rapporteur on Rwanda estimated that between 2,000 and 5,000 pregnancies resulted from war rape (with 250,000 to 500,000 Rwandan women and girls suffering rape). Even after the torturous three months, reintegration was difficult for many people because the violence that had occurred often involved neighbors; people still lived next to rapists, murderers, and torturers. Over the years, however, reintegration between the groups has slowly taken place, especially with the local gacaca (community courts) in place to prosecute participants of the genocide. According to the World Report 2012, community-based gacaca courts had almost completed their work, after trying more than 1.2 million cases related to the 1994 genocide.